Detroit Roundel T-Shirt

Roundels are used on military aircraft as a type of national insignia that takes elements from the national flag. Civil Standard wondered what it would look like if American cities and states had their own roundels based on their respective flags. So we made them.

Detroit's city flag lends itself to a beautifully designed roundel. Designed in 1907 and officially adopted in 1948, the flag has the city seal emblazoned on quartered background, with each section representing a country that once controlled Detroit. The lower hoist (left) quarter represents France, which founded the fort and settlement in 1701; it has five gold fleurs-de-lis on a white field, imitating the Royal Standard of France. The upper fly (right) quarter represents Great Britain, which controlled the fort from 1760 to 1796; it has three gold lions on a red field, imitating the Royal Arms of England. The lower fly has 13 red and white stripes and the upper hoist has 13 white stars on a blue field, representing the original thirteen colonies of the United States.

The two Latin mottos on the seal (not pictured in our rendition) read Speramus Meliora and Resurget Cineribus, meaning "We hope for better things" and "It will rise from the ashes", which was written by Gabriel Richard after the fire of 1805. The seal is a representation of the Detroit fire which occurred on June 11, 1805. The fire caused the entire city to burn with only one building saved from the flames. The figure on the left weeps over the destruction while the figure on the right gestures to the new city that will rise in its place.

• Athletic fit; if you're in-between sizes or prefer a looser fit, we suggest sizing up
• Dark Heather: Combed ring-spun cotton/polyester blend
• White: 100% ring-spun cotton
• Distressed design
• Pre-shrunk
• 4.5 oz/y²

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